Guardians of Our Garden

Roses are red,
Violets are blue.
Seeds were planted in the past, time passed & those seeds grew.
They blossomed & became beautiful; They are symbolic & although the plants can be physically taken out the earth, they remain unmovable. 

August 11th 2015 – the birth of a garden.
The first of much to come. 
We will watch as these things take place.
Each day, from the moment the sunrises to the moment the skies darken.
We shall rest, during the evening, in a state of peace knowing that our garden is safe.

Assassin, Vol. 1

Seeing violence done in the dark has me leaving the light switch off as I speak in silence.
Seeking guidance when seeds of doubt sprout seasonally in my thoughts in result of wars fought with enemies seeking an alliance.
Walking through the alley of death where shadows are said to seen.
Selling souls to satan as satan sells goals that are fed to the fiends.
Motivated by material matter and obtaining it by any means.
Many of these lost souls assume leadership roles; pitching distorted visions in addition to false hope & dreams.
The misguided youth eventually age and become wayward adolescents;
Present yet disengaged from society while coping with their injurious obsessions.
Things that are so detrimental that they can be considered toxic.
Their minds are locked; boxed, but the key is love & God is the locksmith.
The mentality of the environment is the enemy, a merciless force of destruction.
The discretion of the hierarchy lacks consistency causing it to become the source of corruption.
These two factors form a chain reaction as victims began to victimize others.
Whether it’s by taking advantage of their peers or by taking the lives of others
& the cycle continues, it’s persistent; the effects are the equivalent to that of a dark plague.
Who’s to know when this cycle shall be broken; the breakthrough is unclear & remains vague.
As a result we have entered a state of limitations & entrapment – without fully acknowledging the fact that once again we have become enslaved.

RECOUNT: Art of Cool Festival Playlist

In anticipation of Durham’s third annual Art of Cool Festival, RECOUNT presents this 2-hour Spotify playlist of our featured artists! We’ll be bopping around the Bull City all weekend; from the free, family-friendly day parties to the late night/early morning jams to the Innovate Your Cool Conference think tank at American Underground.

From the epic, cross-generational jazz of Kamasi Washington to the stripped-down, modern soul of The Internet, the 2016 Art of Cool Festival boasts a range of diverse, jazz-inspired acts bringing the traditional, the innovative, and everything in between to Durham.


If you’re anywhere near the Triangle this weekend, come out to enjoy local and internationally renowned artists, support local vendors and venues, and embrace the community-building focus of the Art of Cool Project, the 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization hosting this three-day event.

Hope to see ya there. Either way, there’s more to come from us. Stay tuned.

Alex Quirk invites you to explore memory and perception

“In Western thought, the conscious being is often divided into two parts: mind, and body. Senses, and thoughts. Perception, and memory. It seems every conscious thought is rooted in either instantaneous perception or recall. What, then, can be said about a person’s soul if one side of that duality is completely destroyed?” asks Alex Quirk.



Deborah Wearing Enters, the second track of Alex Quirk’s first EP, Looking Up,  explores the concept of instantaneous perception through consummate layers and resonant loops, telling stories of love and learning inspired by the unique life of Clive Wearing.

The video is a visual thought experiment.

It feels like an honest recollection, offering moments of clarity through altered perspective: sunlight entwined with lamplight, motion out of sequence. Clive Wearing’s consciousness is not tethered in the way the rest of ours is. In his amnesia, there is implied conviction that what he sees, feels, and says then and there, is true. That “truth” fades from his existence forever, in seconds.

His experience is enclosed in the present; one could hardly even imagine that as our reality. In our experience, the rest of us relive what we can recall of our lives and loves, again and again, perhaps under the pretense that those memories carry any promises or prescriptions for the future. The present is rarely better; to ascribe permanence to particular moments of instantaneous perception is literally illogical, yet innately human. So in Clive’s case, and in our own, where does meaning come from? As Quirk asks, what can be said about a person’s soul if one side of the mind-body duality is destroyed?

This is where Deborah Wearing Enters.


In his state, Wearing’s wife Deborah is the only human being he recognizes- and enthusiastically greets at every opportunity. That is when he and Deborah share in familiarity and love safe from the amnesia-induced void always a few moments behind him.

Alex Quirk’s visual thought experiment and musical homage to Clive and Deborah Wearing is simultaneously moving and grounding. It takes on that void; it’s a testament to what Clive is reliving through those seconds of clarity with Deborah, definitive of his experience though well beyond articulation.



Visit Alex the Quirk on Facebook.


A fresh lens on Fes

Faces and places in Fes, Morocco captured by Hannah Sommer, our Asheville-based contributing photographer, currently abroad in Europe and North Africa. Her lens invokes a willingness to see, which the natural states of life there greet with a warm welcome.


Mahmoud Hamzi, Hannah Sommer Photography



Hannah Sommer Photography



Hannah Sommer Photography



Hannah Sommer Photography



Hannah Sommer Photography



Hannah Sommer Photography


More on life lived throughout the world, in its simplicity and multiplicity, to come! Follow us or visit the blog at Hannah Sommer Photography to view more from her travels. Definitely check out her incredible thematic work in portraiture, and dope music photography while you’re there.


On the outside looking back: Göran Hugo Olsson documents global history of racial violence

Swedish documentary filmmaker Göran Hugo Olsson explores the visceral, long-standing history of violent treatment of the black community and black bodies through two snapshots, supplemented by the essential components of storytelling. His works feel like collages, in which his voice cannot be detected. Still, from that conscious distance, he presents perspective on the deep roots of racial violence have formed through the observations of the time.

Olsson delves into that process in 2014’s Concerning Violence, presenting through even more vivid, simple elements: Lauryn Hill’s clear, textured voice, archival footage for each chapter, and text from Frantz Fanon’s 1961 analysis of the psychological effects of colonization, The Wretched of the Earthemblazoned across the screen.

His demeanor is disarming, for someone so keen to explore violence, but defiant when he describes his role behind the scenes. Olsson considers himself an illustrator rather than a thinker; if the subject matter were different, one may accuse him of hiding behind that distinction. In this sphere, however, where power, violence, and race collide, the contemporary understanding of how it most certainly went down, is too-often dominated by the pictures history’s victors imagine. As a result, it’s not atypical of us to flounder in articulating change in the face of these narratives. Olsson’s aim is to position the history to speak for itself – presented directly, without interpretation, to the audience. Let’s look into 2011’s, The Black Power Mixtape.

I suggest treating The Black Power Mixtape as you would any other mixtape; it is a period piece with a unique message, a revisiting of an impassioned time through sound and image. It allows you to place today’s issues aside momentarily to take in an account of where we’ve been.

The Black Power Mixtape is presented in 9 chapters, each powerful on its own and moving in sequence. Its greatest value, I found, is in the commentary in response to institutionalized violence, the palatability of the movement for civil and human rights – and the faces of it, as well as the real effects of oppression and violence on the human psyche. I always wonder, is there an answer? A set of instructions? A way of ordering the words? This documentary does not claim that there is, but tells us the role of power dynamics in what America made black people experience, and how black people responsed with resilience.

Olsson’s approach is ideal for providing more context on racial dynamics in the United States of America from 1967-1975: post-Vietnam, during the civil rights movement, in the years following Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s assassination. A raw, global perspective, picking up where Dr. King left off, from the perspective of Swedish filmmakers. Swedish-American media relations were strained by Swedish criticisms of US actions in the Vietnam War. The filmmakers, indicative of Olsson himself, state from the beginning, “We wanted to understand and portray America – through sound and image – as it really is. However, there are about as many opinions on that as there are Americans.”

In fact, black Americans were among the most vocal of those critical about the Vietnam War (see Martin Luther King, Jr.’s sermon, “Why I am Opposed to the War in Vietnam”). The documentary primarily features footage from black communities throughout the years, balancing detachment with immersion, depicting firsthand accounts of the Black Power Movement. Each depiction is a track in the compilation featuring voice-overs and interviews, with contemporary commentary from Erykah Badu, Questlove, and Sonia Sanchez, Angela Davis, and Harry Belafonte.

From the start, you see the way that the violent deaths of the era’s iconic black leaders and their white allies – shake the youth. They claim “there is no future.” Then, along a spectrum of approaches, looked for something of substance in the wake of those losses, something to counter the violent racism enacted upon them to provide an example of the society they envisioned: one where there was security, accessible schooling and healthcare, community.

The Black Power Mixtape provides a view of where America truly started with a candid eye to the violence and power dynamics that once defined us, and may continue to define us. I found it distinguished the Black Lives Matter movement as altogether its own; it brings texture to contemporary discussions of US race relations, the criminal justice system, and poverty.

Individual chapters of The Black Power Mixtape can be found on Youtube, and the complete film can be found on Netflix.


Forty to fifty years ago, when the footage was taken, times were more overtly violent – that is, admittedly, more commentary on what I perceive of civil society then and now, than fact. The 1960s and 70s were closer in proximity to violent norms, slavery, lynching; that is to say, the practices and tensions that manifested in the years between the legal designation of black people as property, and the social and economic integration we are still in the midst of.

For the past three years, with technology and social media broadening the ability to reach out into communities, police brutality has been at the forefront of US discourse and the world is again watching as the violence wreaked by our financially incentivized, structurally racist criminal justice system plays out. That people are watching says we have come a good way; Democratic presidential candidates have spoken openly about criminal justice and drug policy reform. Senator Bernie Sanders explicitly called for community policing, mental health reform, and an end to the prison industrial complex. Grassroots movements around the U.S. nurture community-level reforms and responses to the remnants of the subjugation of  black people, towards institutional police accountability for excessive use of force and discriminatory practices.

We have the opportunity to address the issues of 1967-1975 and well before, but can people handle what the times are telling us even now?

New years with Ms. Lauryn Hill


Hannah Sommer Photography

COLUMBIA, SC It’s an hour til the new year.  The clock is ticking on an empty stage directly in front of the South Carolina State House, where the notorious confederate flag had waved for fifty four years… until 2015 took it down.  A congested and anxious crowd stretches all the way down Main Street as they patiently and confusedly wait for the infamously late Lauryn Hill. An equally confused DJ sporadically appears on stage, giving his all to hype up the crowd with old school hip hop and classic Fugees tracks. Ready or not here she comes.  Lauryn strides across the stage in a layered cape-like black dress and rimmed hat. She sits quietly on the couch in the middle of the stage next to a table of burning white candles. She picks up a guitar, a surprising sight for most fans who know her as a rapper and poppy R&B singer, and lets her voice flow over the relieved crowd, offering a sense of peace to the close of an intense year for the city.


Hannah Sommer Photography

Since the release of her solo – and only – original album, The Miseducation of Lauryn Hill in 1998, Hill has fallen from the public eye to become somewhat of a musical mystery. Ms. Hill, famed for being the first female musician to win five Grammy Awards, is now renowned for her outlandish behaviour and critical comments toward the music industry and press. In 2013, Ms. Hill served three months in prison for tax evasion. Ten years prior, in 2003, Ms. Hill made controversial statements attacking the Catholic church about child molestation, while playing a Christmas concert at the Vatican. She often appears hours late for her shows and will sometime not appear at all.


Hannah Sommer Photography

Despite media criticism, Ms. Hill has kept herself busy with various personal projects. Her dedication to social justice and activism is little-publicized. She founded The Refugee Camp Youth Project in 1996 to help inner city kids and children living in harsh conditions in countries such as Zaire and Haiti. In fact, her performance at Columbia’s “Famously Hot New Year” was a benefit for local victims of the flood that occurred this past fall.

She recently resurfaced, contributing to “What Happened, Miss Simone?,” the critically acclaimed Netflix documentary. “Feeling Good,” is jaw dropping and sincerely showcases Ms. Hill’s connection to the late Nina Simone. The cover expands Simone’s work with a more upbeat rhythm and familiar sentimental undertones.


Hannah Sommer Photography

In the wake of her performance, Ms. Hill’s reputation inconsistency in the public arena is easy to dismiss. This just might be one of the last true artists, not owned by the industry, but by her artistry. She renounces her celebrity status and creates work on her own terms and time, producing for herself and not because it is expected or owed to anyone. Ms. Hill, mother of six and longtime partner of Rohan Marley (yes, Bob Marley’s son), has kept her values close to home. She abandoned the spotlight for the sake of her family and self, an act that we can assume is difficult for one of R&Bs superstars to undertake.

Ms. Lauryn Hill has been an inspiration and influence to many. In 2014, fellow rapper and activist Talib Kweli penned “In Defense of Ms. Hill” on Medium and produced a song titled “Ms. Hill,” spelling out her legacy and struggles with fame in 2005.

She has been referred to as one the greatest R&B singers of all time; and who could doubt it when her seventeen-year-old Miseducation still resonates with crowds and sells records. (Disclosure: Hill’s producer, Phil Nicolo, just made a statement that a new original album is on the horizon.)

As Ms. Hill ends her set with her greatest hit “Doo Wop (That Thing),” the once-restless crowd experiences a tone that cleanses, the capitol of South Carolina bids goodbye and good riddance to the bullet wounds and torrential rains of 2015, and her deep, melodic voice welcomes the birth of a new year.

Photographs by Hannah Sommer. Check her siteInstagram, or Facebook for more.


Hannah Sommer Photography




Photographs by Hannah Sommer. Check her siteInstagram, or Facebook for more.